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Paediatric maxillofacial trauma : a retrospective study of cases treated over four years in the Division of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery - Department of Surgery of the University of the Witwatersrand

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dc.contributor.author Bamjee Y en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-22T11:26:28Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-22T11:26:28Z
dc.date.submitted 1993 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11892/121459
dc.description.abstract Fractures of the facial skeleton are usually reported as infrequent in the paediatric age group, particularly among children who are younger than 12 years of age. Despite perceived lower prevalence of facial fractures compared with that of the adult population, the impact of these injuries could be more serious, because the facial structures were still undergoing significant developmental changes and growth. This study investigated the prevalence of maxillofacial injuries in a South African paediatric population of 326 patients, aged between infancy and 18 years (mean age = 13, 9 years; SD = 8, 2). The results showed that the paediatric population accounted for 8% of all facial trauma cases. Males sustained more injuries than females, by a ratio of 2.3:1. The largest number of injuries (69,6%) was found in the 12-18 years age group, with males being more affected than females, 166 (73,1%) and 61 (26,9%) respectively. Common assaults, fights and gunshots were the most common aetiologies, and accounted for 47,5% of all paediatric maxillofacial trauma cases. Conventional plain films (94, 6%) were obtained as the initial diagnostic study in 76% of patients, and soft tissue injuries accounted for 67% of all associated body injuries. <BR><BR> The most common types of injuries in both sexes were mandibular fractures (63,9%), followed by combined maxillo-mandibular dentoalveolar fractures (25,0%). Analysis of facial fractures subtyping, showed that 22, 5% were mandibular angle fractures and 15, 3% were parasymphyseal fractures. Maxillary dentoalveolar and mandibular body injuries also accounted for significant moderate percentages of 14, 9% and 13, 2% respectively. <BR><BR> It is clear from this study that the prevalence of paediatric maxillofacial injuries in South Africa is fairly high, and is comparable to recent overseas results of paediatric facial trauma. The main difference between the present results and observations from abroad is that violence, instead of vehicular accidents was responsible for the majority of the injuries. en
dc.language English en
dc.title Paediatric maxillofacial trauma : a retrospective study of cases treated over four years in the Division of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery - Department of Surgery of the University of the Witwatersrand en
dc.type Masters degree en
dc.description.degree MDent en


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