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Geographical indications and agricultural products : investigating their relevance in a South African context

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dc.contributor.advisor Kirsten JF, Prof en
dc.contributor.author Grant C en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-26T06:16:13Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-26T06:16:13Z
dc.date.submitted 2005 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11892/165976
dc.description.abstract The European Union is proposing that the additional protection for geographical indications afforded to wine and spirits in Section 23.1 of the TRIPS agreement be extended to include geographical indications of other agricultural products. Their insistence on extending geographical indication protection has led some to believe that the European Union's motive is linked to strategic Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) reforms rather than increased protection for intellectual property rights. The European Union however, claims that their objective is to ensure market access for European geographical indications and that protecting geographical indications is not about protectionism but about free trade. Those opposing incresed protection for geographical indications represent those countries who do not have a strong history of traditional food products and are generally considered new world countries. South Africa, as part of the new world, has as of yet failed to take a position on the matter. In light of this debate, this paper sets out to investigate the relevance of geographical indications in a South African context in order to make recommendations for South Africa's positiion in the debate at multi-lateral level. The topics approached by first contextualising the subject matter where the economic rationale for the protection thereof is eplored. A comprehensive literature study identifies the fators which contribute to a product's potential to benefit from geographical indication protection. Based on these factors South African products are analysed and an ex ante judgment made as to their potential to benefit from geographical indication protection. It is hypothesized that geographical indications are indeed relevant in a South African context given that there are many South African products which are considered to be highly localized with a strong asociation between the region and the product. The pare concludes with reommendations for South Africa's position in the debate at multi-lateral level. en
dc.language English en
dc.subject Agriculture en
dc.subject Agricultural economics and Marketing en
dc.title Geographical indications and agricultural products : investigating their relevance in a South African context en
dc.type Masters degree en
dc.description.degree MCom en


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