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Censorship of the press in South Africa during the Angolan war : a case study of news manipulation and suppression

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dc.contributor.author Addison GN en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-22T08:11:55Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-22T08:11:55Z
dc.date.created 1978 en
dc.date.submitted 1981 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11892/23146
dc.description.abstract During the Angolan War of 1975-6, whilst South African troops were actively engaged on the side of the Unita/FNLA alliance, news media in South Africa were prohibited from disclosing information about the country's role in the war. Under section 118 of the Defence Amendment Act of 1967, no information about SA troop movements or plans could be published without the permission of the Minister of Defence or his nominees. This case study shows how the government used the Defence Act to censor certain news while releasing other news which suited its political outlook and objectives. The study documents the history of the Defence Act and of the military-press liaison machinery which grew out of it. The introduction defines propaganda as a technique of ideological control designed to supplement the control of society by means of repression. The study sets in context the government's propaganda strategy before, during and after the Angolan War, arguing that the structures of white domination, including the newspaper industry, are being drawn into the government's scheme of total co-ordination to fight a total war. en
dc.language English en
dc.subject Communication science en
dc.subject Journalism and the press en
dc.subject 011 History en
dc.title Censorship of the press in South Africa during the Angolan war : a case study of news manipulation and suppression en
dc.type Masters degree en
dc.description.degree MA en


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