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Graphicacy and the third dimension, an investigation into the problem of poor performance in relief mapwork in South African secondary schools

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dc.contributor.author Burton M en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-22T08:13:42Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-22T08:13:42Z
dc.date.created 1994 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11892/25811
dc.description.abstract Three-dimensional graphicacy is the part of mapwork that appears to be the most problematical. Bartz (1970) says that thinking and visualising in three-dimensional space is difficult enough, but trying to derive notions in three-dimensions, when you have only seen them as they are represented in distorted two-dimensional fashion, is even more difficult. Yet pupils of geography are required to learn such three-dimensional concepts from the two-dimensional distorted map presentations. The geography teacher has an important educational role to play in promoting graphicacy and balchin (1965), who coined the term, felf that it should be an essential underpinning of an integrated education. The problem is that children perform badly, teachers are not successfully imparting three-dimensional graphicacy skills and as board and Taylor (1977) indicate, for some time now it has been fashionable to dismiss maps as being irrelevant or useless in geographical research. Attempts to analyse this reported malady, the problems are exposed and solutions offered. Investigation of the literature, with the aim of clarifying the problems involved, follows four leads. These are the part played by the map as a mode of communication, the physical processes involved in mapwork revealed by work in the realm of neuro-physiology, the process of visualisation in the field of perception and psychology, and finally the stage of conceptual development of the mapworker. The state of affairs in South Africa is disclosed by an analysis of teacher-directed literature, of examination syllabuses, of text-book treatment of three-dimensional mapwork in South Africa and overseas, of past examination questions, and finally of teachers' views. Experimental exercises have been executed in an attempt to link the key findings of published research to the local scene. en
dc.language English en
dc.subject Education en
dc.subject Didactics (special school subjects) (from primary to secondary level) en
dc.title Graphicacy and the third dimension, an investigation into the problem of poor performance in relief mapwork in South African secondary schools en
dc.type Masters degree en
dc.description.degree M ED en


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