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Comparison of the effectiveness of group interventions on Indian women diagnosed with mild to moderate depression at an urban psychiatric clinic in South Africa

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dc.contributor.advisor Brookes HB en
dc.contributor.advisor Grainger L, Dr en
dc.contributor.author Chetty D en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-22T06:30:56Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-22T06:30:56Z
dc.date.created 2004 en
dc.date.submitted 2006 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11892/5167
dc.description.abstract Background: Depression is a common mental health disorder experienced by women who attend psychiatric clinics. Antidepressant medication is usually used as a first line treatment. Non-pharmacological modalities such as group therapy are interventions considered for use together with antidepressant medication. There was a need to investigate the use of group interventions implemented by a psychiatric trained registered nurse and a volunteer in a psychiatric out-patients clinic. Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of a nurse-facilitated cognitive therapy group intervention, a volunteer led group therapy intervention and a standard treatment control group on mild to moderately depressed women attending a psychiatric out-patients clinic. Method: 45 women were selected and randomly allocated to three groups, two experimental groups and one control group. Fifteen (15) women experienced nurse-facilitated cognitive therapy intervention sessions, another 15 with volunteer-led crafts groups sessions and the last 15 were in the control group. The control group received no intervention. All 45 women continued with standard treatment, which was prescribed antidepressant medication over the three month period. Pre-test and two sequential post-tests were undertaken using the beck's depression inventory scale-BDI (1978). Results: The intergroup and the intragroup comparisons showed statistically significant improvements in the BDI scores of the intervention groups with p equal to 0.000. There were no changes in the control group. The volunteer led crafts group proved to be purposeful, stimulating and inexpensive. The nurse-facilitated group showed behaviour changes and positive feedback from both participants and staff. Conclusion: This study reflected that group interventions as adjuncts to antidepressant medication were beneficial. Volunteers and psychiatric trained nurses with appropriate training in conducting group interventions may be useful in assisting depressed patients, where specialists are scarce and innovative alternatives are needed in patient care. en
dc.language English en
dc.subject Medical sciences: Nursing en
dc.subject Psychiatric and neurologic nursing en
dc.title Comparison of the effectiveness of group interventions on Indian women diagnosed with mild to moderate depression at an urban psychiatric clinic in South Africa en
dc.type Masters degree en
dc.description.degree MTech Nursing en


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