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Developing and assessing the appropriate of the preliminary food based dietary guidelines for South Africans and food guides currently used in South Africa as nutrition education tools for women in KwaZulu-Natal

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dc.contributor.advisor Maunder E, Prof en
dc.contributor.advisor Green M, Dr en
dc.contributor.author Love PV en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-22T10:15:39Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-22T10:15:39Z
dc.date.created 1998 en
dc.date.submitted 2001 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11892/81149
dc.description.abstract Available evidence suggests that education tools such as dietary guidelines and food guides are commonly misunderstood and applied inappropriately by the consumer. This study highlights the need for consumer testing when developing nutrition education tools to ensure the consumer is able to interpret, understand and apply the nutrition messages. Aim was to investigate the process used by the South African Food-Based Guidelines Work Group in developing the South African food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDGs) for the promotion of health to healthy South Africans older the 5 years of age, to assess the appropriateness of the FBDGs and their suggested food categories in terms of comprehensibility and applicability, to establish criteria for the development of an effective food guide for South Africa. In general, women understood many of the FBDGs and the suggested food categories, and could construct a day's meals using the FBDGs. Areas of confusion were identified regarding certain terminology (especially legumes), concepts (especially foods from animals and healthier snacks), and the categorization of some types of foods (such as avocado, butter, spreads and sugar). Several constraints to implementation of the FBDGs were identified, the primary ones being affordability of food, availability of foods, and household taste preferences. Previous exposure to any of the food guides did not significantly influence food categorization. Use of these food guides was also low, mainly due to a lack of knowledge about how to use them. The food categories of the food guides most familiar to participants namely the 3 and 5 food groups, were compared with those suggested by the FBDGs and personal food categorization as reported by participants. Food categories of the 3 and 5 food group guides did not complement the FBDGs in terms of legume, water, alcohol and salt consumption, and did not always depiet foods that were familiar to and eaten by participants. When women categorized foods according to their own perceptions, a variety of approaches were used, the majority of which mimicked the suggested food categories implicit in the FBDGs. Results indicate that one set of FBDGs was comprehended and applicable for all groups of women represented in KZN. It is recommended that the FBDGs be supported with explanatory constraints to implementation. In terms of the appropriateness of food guides currently used in South Africa, results indicate that existing food guides do not acknowledge personal food categorization as reported by participants, nor do they complement the food categories implicit in the FBDGs. Should nutrition educators in South Africa feel it necessary to make use of a n African food guide be developed that meets the necessary criteria for an effective food guide, namely, that it complements the country's dietary guidelines. And it acknowledges consumer food choice and personal categorization. en
dc.language English en
dc.subject Medical sciences: Health promotion en
dc.subject Dietetics, Nutritional counselling en
dc.title Developing and assessing the appropriate of the preliminary food based dietary guidelines for South Africans and food guides currently used in South Africa as nutrition education tools for women in KwaZulu-Natal en
dc.type Masters degree en
dc.description.degree MSc en


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